Procurement Resource

Corrections1 Guide: How To Buy Body-Worn Cameras

This Corrections1 How to Buy Body-Worn Cameras (BWCs) guide can serve as a starting point for your correctional agency's body-worn camera purchasing process. Please note, this is not an exhaustive list of all issues that should be considered when purchasing BWCs. Work with any necessary internal and external stakeholders involved with your agency to determine what you want to achieve by acquiring BWCs.

“Culture eats strategy for breakfast”: An in-depth examination of police officer perceptions of body-worn camera implementation and their relationship to policy, supervision, and training

Abstract
Research Summary: This study uses interviews with 23 police officers from a small police department to conduct an in-depth examination of their perceptions of three critical but understudied areas related to body-worn camera programs: the implementation and policy-making process, supervision, and training. The focus is on understanding the factors which contribute to, or undermine, body-worn camera integration and acceptance.

How To Buy Body-Worn Cameras: Key steps for product selection, purchasing, and implementation

Never in the history of law enforcement has the American public so vehemently demanded police adopt a technology or device as they have for body-worn cameras (BWCs). Citizens see the technology as ensuring greater visibility into their police force – especially in the case of use-of-force incidents.

BWC Vendor Acquisition Guide

Since the inception of the BWCPIP program in 2015, CNA’s training and technical assistance (TTA) team has worked with hundreds of BWCPIP grantees. The CNA TTA team has worked closely with all types of agencies—large and small, urban, suburban, and rural. CNA has provided TTA to sheriffs’ departments, tribal law enforcement, university police, transportation authority police, school police departments, and park police. CNA has also assisted agencies in implementing BWC programs in county jails and with state correctional agencies. 

Options for Body-Worn Camera Placement: A Tool for Mount Locations

Several different mount configurations are available for body-worn cameras (BWCs). These mounts can be used with a wide variety of uniforms to hold the camera to officers' or deputies' shirts, patrol vests, hats, or jackets. The red dots on the uniform below correspond to different locations you may choose to mount your BWCs, with benefits and limitations of each location detailed in the following pages.

BWC Field Testing & Evaluation Form

The BWC TTA team has just released a new resource: BWC Field Testing & Evaluation Form. This resource will help agencies evaluate the performance and suitability of different models of body-worn cameras (BWCs). The Field Testing Form (an Excel workbook) includes multiple tabs for field testers to record ratings of different aspects of BWCs, across different brands. As agencies implementing BWCs may consider many different aspects, the Testing and Evaluation Resource should be adapted to meet your agency's needs.

Body-Worn Camera Site Spotlight: Park City, UT

Park City, Utah, is known for its beautiful alpine scenery, its magnificent skiing, and as host of the Sundance Film Festival, but it was also one of the first US jurisdictions to implement body worn cameras (BWCs). In 2013, the Park City Police Department (PCPD) decided BWCs might help its officers better serve their 8,000 full-time residents and the 100,000 tourists that descend on the city during peak season. They were right—after BWCs were deployed, uses of force dropped by 42 percent and complaints declined drastically. According to the city prosecutor, the courts also benefited.

Body-Worn Cameras in Community Supervision

Video technology has been an important public safety tool for decades. From the earliest closed-circuit television (CCTV) systems in correctional facilities to in-dash cameras in police vehicles, video technology has been used to deter criminal behavior, document encounters or behaviors of interest, and to investigate and solve crimes. The current iteration of video technology in public safety is body-worn cameras (BWC). The use of BWCs dates back to 2005 when small-scale tests were conducted in police departments in the United Kingdom (Goodall, 2007).