Stakeholders

Resources about Stakeholders & Stakeholder Engagement

Body-Worn Cameras: Reducing Risk and Ensuring Compliance Webinar

On Friday, March 27th at 1PM ET, the BWC TTA provider hosted a webinar, Body-Worn Cameras: Reducing Risk and Ensuring Compliance. This webinar provided insights and imparted experiences regarding how and why police agencies review body-worn camera videos and audit body-worn camera programs for compliance. Presenters discussed how to strike the proper balance between compliance and discipline.

This webinar consisted of a panel of three experts from different sized agencies, who discussed their experiences with body worn camera compliance reviews and audits.

In View From the Field – Washington, DC Metropolitan Police Department

The Washington, DC, Metropolitan Police Department began researching body-worn cameras (BWCs) in 2013 and began implementing its BWC program in 2015 with the receipt of a Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) BWC Policy and Implementation Program (PIP) grant. The agency employs approximately 4,500 personnel, of which 3,200 are assigned a BWC. During BWC planning, DC Metro decided to take a different approach implementing this technology compared to previous technology implementations.

In View: How to Manage the Implementation of your Body-Worn Camera (BWC) Deployment and Improve Outcomes

 

You have written your policy, you have selected your camera vendor, and you have trained your officers and deployed your cameras. Now what? Will your agency’s deployment be successful? Do you know if it was worth all the time, effort, and resources? Are you able to point out successes to your community and local officials? Are you able to identify challenges and develop solutions? Can you assess implementation progress and improve outcomes to make the deployment more valuable to your agency, your officers, and your community?

Understanding the Impact of Police Body-Worn Cameras on Virginia Public Defenders

In the past five years, body-worn cameras (BWCs) have disseminated widely and rapidly to police departments across the United States (White & Malm, 2020). In 2013, only one-third of agencies had some form of BWC program, most of which were small-scale pilot programs of the relatively new technology (Reaves, 2015). By 2016, about half of agencies had BWCs, including nearly 80% of large agencies (more than 500 sworn personnel) (Hyland, 2018). The push for BWCs came at a time when there was a severe dearth of research from which to draw guidance or best practices.