Research

Resources about Research on BWCs and Related Issues

BWC Effects on Organizational and Individual Outcomes: Findings from the Latest Research, Pt. II

This webinar is part 2 in a series that explores in greater depth the results discussed in a 2021 BWC Research Convening. That meeting brought together a dozen researchers to discuss the latest in topics, findings, and challenges in BWC research. These webinars center on a more intensive public presentation and discussion of the themes that emerged from that Research Convening. This webinar features Dr. Jessica Huff from the University of Nebraska, Omaha, Dr. Eric Piza of John Jay College, and Dr. Vaughn Crichlow from Florida Atlantic University.

An Examination of Body-Worn Camera Digital Evidence Management (DEM) Strategies

Over the last few years, thousands of law enforcement agencies in the United States have adopted body-worn cameras (BWCs), and those agencies immediately had to deal with the tremendous amount of digital evidence generated by the technology. Digital evidence management (DEM) is the process by which an agency manages, stores, and transmits the data generated by BWCs and other devices (e.g., other types of cameras, cell phones). DEM is a critically important feature of a successful BWC program.

Optimizing Body-Worn Cameras to Enhance Common Police Practices and Field Investigations

As more police agencies have adopted BWCs on their own initiative, and at least seven states have recently moved to mandate their use, BWCs are becoming a permanent fixture for the majority of police agencies. As BWCs continue to garner widespread support across varied segments of the public and of law enforcement, the benefits of this technology are becoming firmly established and agencies are demonstrating novel ways to use BWCs to improve policing.

Managing Digital Evidence from Body-Worn Cameras: Case Studies in Seven Sites

Digital Evidence Management (DEM) encompasses a wide variety of devices, technologies, tools, and data, particularly as they relate to the criminal justice system (Goodison, Davis, and Jackson, 2015). This report is about body-worn cameras (BWCs) and the digital evidence (footage) created by the technology. The main purpose of the study is to understand and explain the key challenges faced by law enforcement agencies and prosecutor offices as they use BWCs routinely.

BWC Effects on Organizational and Individual Outcomes: Findings from the Latest Research

This webinar explored the latest research on the effect of BWCs on organizational and individual outcomes. Dr. Mike White provided introductory remarks, and Dr. Charles Katz facilitated the session. Speakers, Dr. Jennifer Wood (Temple University), Dr. Joel Miller (Rutgers University), and Dr. John McCluskey (Rochester Institute for Technology), presented on their most recent body-worn camera research findings. Dr. Wood’s project, titled “Behaving better in front of the lens: Possibilities of change according to police and residents in Philadelphia”; Dr.

Assessing the Utility of Body-Worn Cameras for Collegiate Police Agencies

Nearly all scholarship on body-worn cameras (BWCs) has focused on municipal police departments, as they comprise a majority of sworn agencies. Given the unique environment of collegiate law enforcement agencies, however, it is possible that their paths to BWCs—and the benefits and challenges they experience—vary from that of more traditional agencies. Using a survey of 126 collegiate police departments and in-depth interviews with 15 collegiate police executives, this study describes their goals, challenges, and benefits related to BWCs.